5 Business Boosters Guaranteed to Give You a Competitive Advantage

Inside Fizzle there’s a course called “Choosing a Topic.” This is one of our most popular courses, and it’s at the beginning of the roadmap.

This course helps people in three different situations starting out on the entrepreneurial path:

  1. “I have too many potential business ideas and don’t know how to choose just one.”
  2. “I don’t have any ideas, how do I come up with a good one.”
  3. “I have my heart set on this one idea, is it any good?”

The course guides people through a series of lessons aimed at helping them choose the best business idea for them, based on several essential criteria.

One of those essential criterion is something we call “business boosters.” A business booster is something that gives you an advantage over the competition.

On today’s episode of The Fizzle Show podcast we discuss five categories of business boosters guaranteed to give you a meaningful competitive advantage. Any business idea you choose should have at least one of these, preferably more than one.

It’s better to listen on the go!  
 Subscribe on iTunes 

Subscribe (how to)  
iTunes  
Overcast  
Pocket Casts  
Stitcher  
Soundcloud  
RSS  

“5 Business Boosters Guaranteed to Give You a Competitive Advantage”


Here are the 5 business boosters, along with some examples for each. Listen to the episode above for more examples and a full definition for each booster.

1) A new and fast growing topic

When a topic is fresh and fast-growing, it’s much easier to become an expert because there are no true experts yet. The people who know the most about a new topic may only have months or years (not decades) of experience.

Contrast that to a long-established topic. You might have to compete with people who have turned such a topic into their life’s work, literally.

A new topic can be fertile ground for a new business.

Example: when I started blogging, I initially wanted to write about life and career, and the relationship between them. Quickly I stumbled onto new and hot topics including “lifestyle design” and “location independence.” I pursued these topics and wrote about them weekly. Because there were few established experts, I was able to gain recognition easily, and ride the wave of growing demand, which led my new blog to over 500,000 readers it’s the first year.

2) Existing expertise: something you’re already deeply invested in and good at

There’s a tendency among new entrepreneurs to pass over existing expertise in favor of starting over in a completely new field or topic.

This can be a huge mistake. Even though it may be tempting, don’t throw away your expertise and start over. Instead, see if there’s a way to leverage that expertise in a fresh way that is fun for you and the basis for a great business idea.

Example: Scott Devine worked as a professional electric bass player for years, touring with bands and teaching students one on one. When Scott decided to build a business, he leveraged those years of expertise instead of starting over. This led him to Scott’s Bass Lessons, one of the most successful instrument teaching businesses online.

3) Something you love more than most people, something you eat, sleep and breathe

Excitement, curiosity, love for something can be a great motivator that can give you a distinct advantage over other people who don’t care as much. If you eat, sleep and breath a topic, it will be easy to out-effort your competition, simply for the love of it. Your care for what you’re doing will impress potential customers.

Example: Scott Dinsmore was obsessed with helping people find a career that they truly love. He was known as the go-to guy among friends and colleagues who were unhappy with their jobs and careers. He spent hours meeting with and discussing options with people, because he simply loved seeing people transform when they finally found something they loved. This led to creating Live Your Legend, and his passion gave Scott an advantage over so many other career change focused projects.

4) Inside connections: knowing someone or having access to resources that can give you advantages in a particular industry

They say it’s not what you know, but who you know. Well, who do you know? If you have a connection to someone or something that can give your new business a boost, you should consider ways to put that connection to use.

Example: my father-in-law had to change careers at around 50 years old. Imagine how hard that must be, to switch gears completely after spending 30 years building your career. Luckily, one of his best friends was a real estate appraiser. By leveraging this connection, he was able to start up a new business as an appraiser relatively quickly, much faster than if he had chosen a different path without a similar connection.

5) The wild card: anything else that can give you an important advantage over the competition

The best competitive advantages are often not obvious ones. Before you choose a business idea, make a list of every ability, skill, resource, connection, experience and opportunity you have. Consider how each of these could help your new business get off the ground.

Example: Chase has a background as a designer, and I’ve worked as a software developer. This became a huge advantage in starting Fizzle, as we created our community and learning platform quickly and cheaply, building something that no other online community shares.

There are many more examples and details for each of these business boosters in our podcast episode above. Check it out for more ideas on how you can put these and other business boosters to work for you.

Inside Fizzle there’s a course called “Choosing a Topic.” This is one of our most popular courses, and it’s at the beginning of the roadmap.

This course helps people in three different situations starting out on the entrepreneurial path:

  1. “I have too many potential business ideas and don’t know how to choose just one.”
  2. “I don’t have any ideas, how do I come up with a good one.”
  3. “I have my heart set on this one idea, is it any good?”

The course guides people through a series of lessons aimed at helping them choose the best business idea for them, based on several essential criteria.

One of those essential criterion is something we call “business boosters.” A business booster is something that gives you an advantage over the competition.

On today’s episode of The Fizzle Show podcast we discuss five categories of business boosters guaranteed to give you a meaningful competitive advantage. Any business idea you choose should have at least one of these, preferably more than one.

It’s better to listen on the go!  
 Subscribe on iTunes 

Subscribe (how to)  
iTunes  
Overcast  
Pocket Casts  
Stitcher  
Soundcloud  
RSS  

“5 Business Boosters Guaranteed to Give You a Competitive Advantage”


Here are the 5 business boosters, along with some examples for each. Listen to the episode above for more examples and a full definition for each booster.

1) A new and fast growing topic

When a topic is fresh and fast-growing, it’s much easier to become an expert because there are no true experts yet. The people who know the most about a new topic may only have months or years (not decades) of experience.

Contrast that to a long-established topic. You might have to compete with people who have turned such a topic into their life’s work, literally.

A new topic can be fertile ground for a new business.

Example: when I started blogging, I initially wanted to write about life and career, and the relationship between them. Quickly I stumbled onto new and hot topics including “lifestyle design” and “location independence.” I pursued these topics and wrote about them weekly. Because there were few established experts, I was able to gain recognition easily, and ride the wave of growing demand, which led my new blog to over 500,000 readers it’s the first year.

2) Existing expertise: something you’re already deeply invested in and good at

There’s a tendency among new entrepreneurs to pass over existing expertise in favor of starting over in a completely new field or topic.

This can be a huge mistake. Even though it may be tempting, don’t throw away your expertise and start over. Instead, see if there’s a way to leverage that expertise in a fresh way that is fun for you and the basis for a great business idea.

Example: Scott Devine worked as a professional electric bass player for years, touring with bands and teaching students one on one. When Scott decided to build a business, he leveraged those years of expertise instead of starting over. This led him to Scott’s Bass Lessons, one of the most successful instrument teaching businesses online.

3) Something you love more than most people, something you eat, sleep and breathe

Excitement, curiosity, love for something can be a great motivator that can give you a distinct advantage over other people who don’t care as much. If you eat, sleep and breath a topic, it will be easy to out-effort your competition, simply for the love of it. Your care for what you’re doing will impress potential customers.

Example: Scott Dinsmore was obsessed with helping people find a career that they truly love. He was known as the go-to guy among friends and colleagues who were unhappy with their jobs and careers. He spent hours meeting with and discussing options with people, because he simply loved seeing people transform when they finally found something they loved. This led to creating Live Your Legend, and his passion gave Scott an advantage over so many other career change focused projects.

4) Inside connections: knowing someone or having access to resources that can give you advantages in a particular industry

They say it’s not what you know, but who you know. Well, who do you know? If you have a connection to someone or something that can give your new business a boost, you should consider ways to put that connection to use.

Example: my father-in-law had to change careers at around 50 years old. Imagine how hard that must be, to switch gears completely after spending 30 years building your career. Luckily, one of his best friends was a real estate appraiser. By leveraging this connection, he was able to start up a new business as an appraiser relatively quickly, much faster than if he had chosen a different path without a similar connection.

5) The wild card: anything else that can give you an important advantage over the competition

The best competitive advantages are often not obvious ones. Before you choose a business idea, make a list of every ability, skill, resource, connection, experience and opportunity you have. Consider how each of these could help your new business get off the ground.

Example: Chase has a background as a designer, and I’ve worked as a software developer. This became a huge advantage in starting Fizzle, as we created our community and learning platform quickly and cheaply, building something that no other online community shares.

There are many more examples and details for each of these business boosters in our podcast episode above. Check it out for more ideas on how you can put these and other business boosters to work for you.

You Know You Need to Define Your Ideal Client, Target Market & Niche, Right? (FS208)

We’re willing to bet you’ve heard and read lots of talk about the importance of pinpointing your ideal client, identifying a target market and picking a niche.

Maybe you’re even sick of these concepts? (It’s okay, you can roll your eyes a little!)

You’re probably tired of hearing these buzzwords because they get thrown around way too often without much meaning attached to them.

Rather than simply passing out the same old advice, we’re going to spend this episode breaking down what each one means, and what to actually DO with that info.

So before you skip this one thinking you’ve heard all there is to hear about these topics, hear us out.

Let us guess what you’re thinking right now. It might be something like:

  • I don’t want to say NO to potential customers. Can’t I just work with whoever I can work with?
  • I just want to [make my product/work with people/write what I want to write]. Why do I have to spend time on this when My Favorite Blogger/Podcaster “does it all”?
  • What happens if I pick the wrong thing?

We get it. Today we’re tackling all of these concerns, and we’re laying out what these ideas actually mean — and how you can use them to power your business.

It’s better to listen on the go!  
 Subscribe on iTunes 

Subscribe (how to)  
iTunes  
Overcast  
Pocket Casts  
Stitcher  
Soundcloud  
RSS  

First Things First: Defining Terms You Need to Know

Inside Fizzle there are two courses that dive deep into this stuff: “Book Yourself Solid” and “Defining Your Audience”.

To learn more about Fizzle courses and membership benefits click here.

In addition to downloadable worksheets designed to guide you through putting these much-hyped concepts into real action, we define all of the terms you need to know.

Ideal Client: the individual you want to work with based on their values, qualities & characteristics

This isn’t about some picking some vague “customer avatar” out of thin air. In our Defining Your Audience course, Chase offers an excellent exercise to help you really nail this.

Imagine a specific human being — seriously, call his or her face to mind and write down a name — who you feel especially well-equipped to help. This person is your ideal client.

Inside our community at Fizzle, we often see that introducing a dose of reality here resolves the uncertainty people feel about who they really want to work with.

So pick a real person, and if you can’t think of anyone you’ve ever met that would benefit from your product or service, that’s a red flag too. Perhaps you aren’t clear on how you can help people, or you haven’t hit on the right idea yet.

Target Market: the specific group of people or businesses you want to serve

So now we have an ideal client, but how do we get to target market?

Once you have that “one person” Chase talks about, you can put pen to paper and understand the broader characteristics of the market.

Where does that person shop? What do they like? Where do they hang out? What kind of language appeals to them? What adjectives describe them?

Now we’re heading towards a group of people we can aim products, services and content toward.

Niche: the specific service you specialize in offering to your target market

Many people get to target market only to fall down at the niche part. Questions like “am I narrow enough?” and “how narrow is too narrow?” pop up and cause confusion.

We know it can feel limiting to think about “picking a niche” since the door closes on so many other ideas you might have. Instead, try to focus your attention towards the service you’ll specialize in for this market.

You can always change course later, but for now we’ll select something specific that we believe will help this group of people.

Needs: Pressing problems and urgencies in their life. Typically things you want to move AWAY from.

Desires: Things you want in the future. Typically things you’d like to move TOWARD.

In this episode, I mention Larabar as a good example of a product that integrates all of these concepts.

Not too long ago, there weren’t many prepared food options for snackers who wanted to eat very simple ingredients. Larabar offered a solution: an extremely simple whole foods snack bar with just a handful of ingredients.

These customers wanted to move toward a tasty quick snack they could feel good about that could also be thrown in a bag on the go. They wanted to move away from snack foods that have a bunch of foreign ingredients.

While Larabar is quite popular these days, plenty of people have tried their bars and hate them. Plenty more people will never try them because healthy food isn’t really a priority or interest for them.

This product is not for everybody … and as a result, it’s very much for a particular kind of person. See how this stuff really works in practice?

So what do we do next?

With our definitions in hand, we can ask ourselves some questions that address, once and for all, the “am I narrow enough?” question. Once again, these questions come from our Book Yourself Solid course, so check that out if you want to go even deeper.

Three questions that reveal whether you have a well-defined target market:

  1. Do you know where to find these people so you can concentrate your marketing efforts?
  2. Do they have existing networks of communication you can use to connect with them?
  3. Will they know you’re committed to serving them?

I’m a big fan of that third question in particular. When your ideal client lands on your website, meets you at a conference or finds you on social media, is “what you do” going to smack them in the face?

Will they know, without a doubt, that you’re the go-to girl or guy for them, or will they be confused about whether someone like you really knows how to help someone like them?

If you’re having trouble coming up with answers to these, chances are you’ve got some more work to do when it comes to zooming in on the right market.

There’s lots more where this came from in the Book Yourself Solid & Defining Your Audience Fizzle courses. To learn more about Fizzle courses and membership benefits click here.

We’re willing to bet you’ve heard and read lots of talk about the importance of pinpointing your ideal client, identifying a target market and picking a niche.

Maybe you’re even sick of these concepts? (It’s okay, you can roll your eyes a little!)

You’re probably tired of hearing these buzzwords because they get thrown around way too often without much meaning attached to them.

Rather than simply passing out the same old advice, we’re going to spend this episode breaking down what each one means, and what to actually DO with that info.

So before you skip this one thinking you’ve heard all there is to hear about these topics, hear us out.

Let us guess what you’re thinking right now. It might be something like:

  • I don’t want to say NO to potential customers. Can’t I just work with whoever I can work with?
  • I just want to [make my product/work with people/write what I want to write]. Why do I have to spend time on this when My Favorite Blogger/Podcaster “does it all”?
  • What happens if I pick the wrong thing?

We get it. Today we’re tackling all of these concerns, and we’re laying out what these ideas actually mean — and how you can use them to power your business.

It’s better to listen on the go!  
 Subscribe on iTunes 

Subscribe (how to)  
iTunes  
Overcast  
Pocket Casts  
Stitcher  
Soundcloud  
RSS  

First Things First: Defining Terms You Need to Know

Inside Fizzle there are two courses that dive deep into this stuff: “Book Yourself Solid” and “Defining Your Audience”.

To learn more about Fizzle courses and membership benefits click here.

In addition to downloadable worksheets designed to guide you through putting these much-hyped concepts into real action, we define all of the terms you need to know.

Ideal Client: the individual you want to work with based on their values, qualities & characteristics

This isn’t about some picking some vague “customer avatar” out of thin air. In our Defining Your Audience course, Chase offers an excellent exercise to help you really nail this.

Imagine a specific human being — seriously, call his or her face to mind and write down a name — who you feel especially well-equipped to help. This person is your ideal client.

Inside our community at Fizzle, we often see that introducing a dose of reality here resolves the uncertainty people feel about who they really want to work with.

So pick a real person, and if you can’t think of anyone you’ve ever met that would benefit from your product or service, that’s a red flag too. Perhaps you aren’t clear on how you can help people, or you haven’t hit on the right idea yet.

Target Market: the specific group of people or businesses you want to serve

So now we have an ideal client, but how do we get to target market?

Once you have that “one person” Chase talks about, you can put pen to paper and understand the broader characteristics of the market.

Where does that person shop? What do they like? Where do they hang out? What kind of language appeals to them? What adjectives describe them?

Now we’re heading towards a group of people we can aim products, services and content toward.

Niche: the specific service you specialize in offering to your target market

Many people get to target market only to fall down at the niche part. Questions like “am I narrow enough?” and “how narrow is too narrow?” pop up and cause confusion.

We know it can feel limiting to think about “picking a niche” since the door closes on so many other ideas you might have. Instead, try to focus your attention towards the service you’ll specialize in for this market.

You can always change course later, but for now we’ll select something specific that we believe will help this group of people.

Needs: Pressing problems and urgencies in their life. Typically things you want to move AWAY from.

Desires: Things you want in the future. Typically things you’d like to move TOWARD.

In this episode, I mention Larabar as a good example of a product that integrates all of these concepts.

Not too long ago, there weren’t many prepared food options for snackers who wanted to eat very simple ingredients. Larabar offered a solution: an extremely simple whole foods snack bar with just a handful of ingredients.

These customers wanted to move toward a tasty quick snack they could feel good about that could also be thrown in a bag on the go. They wanted to move away from snack foods that have a bunch of foreign ingredients.

While Larabar is quite popular these days, plenty of people have tried their bars and hate them. Plenty more people will never try them because healthy food isn’t really a priority or interest for them.

This product is not for everybody … and as a result, it’s very much for a particular kind of person. See how this stuff really works in practice?

So what do we do next?

With our definitions in hand, we can ask ourselves some questions that address, once and for all, the “am I narrow enough?” question. Once again, these questions come from our Book Yourself Solid course, so check that out if you want to go even deeper.

Three questions that reveal whether you have a well-defined target market:

  1. Do you know where to find these people so you can concentrate your marketing efforts?
  2. Do they have existing networks of communication you can use to connect with them?
  3. Will they know you’re committed to serving them?

I’m a big fan of that third question in particular. When your ideal client lands on your website, meets you at a conference or finds you on social media, is “what you do” going to smack them in the face?

Will they know, without a doubt, that you’re the go-to girl or guy for them, or will they be confused about whether someone like you really knows how to help someone like them?

If you’re having trouble coming up with answers to these, chances are you’ve got some more work to do when it comes to zooming in on the right market.

There’s lots more where this came from in the Book Yourself Solid & Defining Your Audience Fizzle courses. To learn more about Fizzle courses and membership benefits click here.

Tadalafil Pas Cher Livraison Gratuite – Airmail Expédition – Sans Ordonnance

Tadalafil Pas Cher Livraison Gratuite

Générique Tadacip
Ou Achetez Tadacip Tadalafil Bon Marche. Tadacip générique est une alternative efficace au Cialis, qui est souvent connue comme la pilule du week-end, offrant une performance sexuelle améliorée et une meilleure endurance pour les hommes.
*Tadacip® est fabriqué par Cipla Ltd.


Note 4.6 étoiles, basé sur 197 commentaires.


Prix à partir €1.18 Par unité

Follow this link to Order Generic Tadacip (Tadalafil) NOW!

Ordonner 20 mg Tadacip Bas Prix
Le Meilleur Site Pour Acheter Du Tadacip 20 mg
Acheter Tadacip 20 mg Pa Cher
Générique Tadalafil Acheter En Ligne
Acheté Générique Tadacip 20 mg Danemark
Acheter Du Tadalafil
Achat Tadacip Bangkok
achetez Générique Tadacip 20 mg Royaume-Uni
Acheter Tadacip Fabriqué En France
Commander Tadacip 20 mg Peu Coûteux
Acheter Tadalafil Pharmacie En Ligne

buy Wellbutrin Sr

Tadacip Tadalafil Bon Marché Générique
Ou Acheter Du Tadacip 20 mg A Lyon Sans Ordonnance
Commander Tadalafil Bas Prix
Qui A Acheter Du Tadalafil Sur Internet
Achat Tadalafil En Ligne Pas Cher
Acheter Tadacip Sans Ordonnance Canada
Achetez Tadalafil Bon Marché Sans Ordonnance
Ou Acheter Generique Tadacip 20 mg Forum
Acheter Tadacip Montreal
Acheter Tadacip France Pharmacie
Achat Générique Tadacip 20 mg Paris
Commander Générique 20 mg Tadacip Bâle
Achetez Générique Tadalafil Bas Prix
Commander Générique Tadacip 20 mg Québec
Site Francais Pour Acheter Du Tadacip 20 mg
Tadacip Tadalafil Achat Sur Internet
Buy Tadacip Tabs
Ordonner Générique Tadalafil Europe
Acheter Du Vrai Tadacip Tadalafil Pas Cher
Acheter Vrai Tadacip En France
Achat De Tadalafil Au Canada
Tadalafil Achat
Acheté Générique Tadalafil Bordeaux
Tadacip Vente En Ligne Belgique
Achat Tadacip 20 mg Libre
Acheté Générique Tadalafil L’espagne
Acheter Tadalafil 48h
Acheter Générique 20 mg Tadacip Ottawa
Ou Acheter Tadacip Generique En Ligne
Buy Tadacip With Mastercard
Tadacip 20 mg Montreal Pharmacie En Ligne
Tadalafil Pas Cher Inde
Ou Acheter Du Tadalafil Au Canada
Commander 20 mg Tadacip Générique
Achetez Générique Tadacip Strasbourg
Tadacip 20 mg Achat En France
Achetez 20 mg Tadacip Bas Prix
Tadacip Tadalafil combien ça coûte
Achat Tadacip Tadalafil À Prix Réduit
Acheter Du Vrai Générique Tadalafil Zürich
Ordonner Tadalafil Générique
Buy Tadacip Reviews
Ordonner Tadacip 20 mg À Prix Réduit
Ou Acheter Du Tadacip Au Canada
Acheter Maintenant 20 mg Tadacip
Achetez Générique 20 mg Tadacip La Dinde
Acheter Tadacip 20 mg Avec Mastercard
Buy Tadalafil Retail
Ordonner Générique Tadacip Zürich
Site Fiable Acheter Tadacip
Achat Générique Tadacip 20 mg Lausanne
Achetez Générique Tadacip Tadalafil Toulouse
Commander 20 mg Tadacip Bon Marché
Avis Acheter Tadacip En Ligne
Acheter Générique Tadalafil Ottawa
acheter du vrai Générique Tadacip 20 mg Pays-Bas
Tadacip En Ligne En France
Acheter Tadacip Bas Prix Sans Ordonnance
Achat Tadalafil Peu Coûteux
Tadacip Peu Coûteux
Achat Tadacip 20 mg Moins Cher Sans Ordonnance
Ou Acheter Tadacip 20 mg Générique
acheter du vrai Tadacip Tadalafil à prix réduit

Beställ Cialis Oral Jelly
cheap Cozaar
buy Artane
Safe Buy 100 mg Prometrium generic
Neurontin Comparaison

enkoQDf

Tadalafil Pas Cher Livraison Gratuite

Générique Tadacip
Ou Achetez Tadacip Tadalafil Bon Marche. Tadacip générique est une alternative efficace au Cialis, qui est souvent connue comme la pilule du week-end, offrant une performance sexuelle améliorée et une meilleure endurance pour les hommes.
*Tadacip® est fabriqué par Cipla Ltd.


Note 4.6 étoiles, basé sur 197 commentaires.


Prix à partir €1.18 Par unité

Follow this link to Order Generic Tadacip (Tadalafil) NOW!

Ordonner 20 mg Tadacip Bas Prix
Le Meilleur Site Pour Acheter Du Tadacip 20 mg
Acheter Tadacip 20 mg Pa Cher
Générique Tadalafil Acheter En Ligne
Acheté Générique Tadacip 20 mg Danemark
Acheter Du Tadalafil
Achat Tadacip Bangkok
achetez Générique Tadacip 20 mg Royaume-Uni
Acheter Tadacip Fabriqué En France
Commander Tadacip 20 mg Peu Coûteux
Acheter Tadalafil Pharmacie En Ligne

buy Wellbutrin Sr

Tadacip Tadalafil Bon Marché Générique
Ou Acheter Du Tadacip 20 mg A Lyon Sans Ordonnance
Commander Tadalafil Bas Prix
Qui A Acheter Du Tadalafil Sur Internet
Achat Tadalafil En Ligne Pas Cher
Acheter Tadacip Sans Ordonnance Canada
Achetez Tadalafil Bon Marché Sans Ordonnance
Ou Acheter Generique Tadacip 20 mg Forum
Acheter Tadacip Montreal
Acheter Tadacip France Pharmacie
Achat Générique Tadacip 20 mg Paris
Commander Générique 20 mg Tadacip Bâle
Achetez Générique Tadalafil Bas Prix
Commander Générique Tadacip 20 mg Québec
Site Francais Pour Acheter Du Tadacip 20 mg
Tadacip Tadalafil Achat Sur Internet
Buy Tadacip Tabs
Ordonner Générique Tadalafil Europe
Acheter Du Vrai Tadacip Tadalafil Pas Cher
Acheter Vrai Tadacip En France
Achat De Tadalafil Au Canada
Tadalafil Achat
Acheté Générique Tadalafil Bordeaux
Tadacip Vente En Ligne Belgique
Achat Tadacip 20 mg Libre
Acheté Générique Tadalafil L’espagne
Acheter Tadalafil 48h
Acheter Générique 20 mg Tadacip Ottawa
Ou Acheter Tadacip Generique En Ligne
Buy Tadacip With Mastercard
Tadacip 20 mg Montreal Pharmacie En Ligne
Tadalafil Pas Cher Inde
Ou Acheter Du Tadalafil Au Canada
Commander 20 mg Tadacip Générique
Achetez Générique Tadacip Strasbourg
Tadacip 20 mg Achat En France
Achetez 20 mg Tadacip Bas Prix
Tadacip Tadalafil combien ça coûte
Achat Tadacip Tadalafil À Prix Réduit
Acheter Du Vrai Générique Tadalafil Zürich
Ordonner Tadalafil Générique
Buy Tadacip Reviews
Ordonner Tadacip 20 mg À Prix Réduit
Ou Acheter Du Tadacip Au Canada
Acheter Maintenant 20 mg Tadacip
Achetez Générique 20 mg Tadacip La Dinde
Acheter Tadacip 20 mg Avec Mastercard
Buy Tadalafil Retail
Ordonner Générique Tadacip Zürich
Site Fiable Acheter Tadacip
Achat Générique Tadacip 20 mg Lausanne
Achetez Générique Tadacip Tadalafil Toulouse
Commander 20 mg Tadacip Bon Marché
Avis Acheter Tadacip En Ligne
Acheter Générique Tadalafil Ottawa
acheter du vrai Générique Tadacip 20 mg Pays-Bas
Tadacip En Ligne En France
Acheter Tadacip Bas Prix Sans Ordonnance
Achat Tadalafil Peu Coûteux
Tadacip Peu Coûteux
Achat Tadacip 20 mg Moins Cher Sans Ordonnance
Ou Acheter Tadacip 20 mg Générique
acheter du vrai Tadacip Tadalafil à prix réduit

Beställ Cialis Oral Jelly
cheap Cozaar
buy Artane
Safe Buy 100 mg Prometrium generic
Neurontin Comparaison

enkoQDf

All Things Seem Possible In May! Unique Wallpapers To Freshen Up Your Desktop






 



 


We always try our best to challenge your creativity and get you out of your comfort zone. A great occasion to do so is our monthly wallpapers challenge which has been going on for eight years already.

Desktop Wallpaper Calendars May 2017

It’s an opportunity to let your ideas run wild and try something new, to indulge in a little project just for fun. Whatever technique you fancy, whatever story you want to tell with your wallpaper, the submissions to this challenge make a beautiful, unique bouquet of community artworks each month anew. Artworks that adorn desktops and, who knows, maybe even spark new ideas.

The post All Things Seem Possible In May! Unique Wallpapers To Freshen Up Your Desktop appeared first on Smashing Magazine.






 



 


We always try our best to challenge your creativity and get you out of your comfort zone. A great occasion to do so is our monthly wallpapers challenge which has been going on for eight years already.

Desktop Wallpaper Calendars May 2017

It’s an opportunity to let your ideas run wild and try something new, to indulge in a little project just for fun. Whatever technique you fancy, whatever story you want to tell with your wallpaper, the submissions to this challenge make a beautiful, unique bouquet of community artworks each month anew. Artworks that adorn desktops and, who knows, maybe even spark new ideas.

The post All Things Seem Possible In May! Unique Wallpapers To Freshen Up Your Desktop appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

How to Use SMS Marketing to Boost Your Blog’s Audience

SMS marketing for Bloggers - ProBlogger.com

This guest post is by Josh Sayers of Adventure Connections

Remember SMS? That old-school way of texting people before the dawn of i-message and Whatsapp?

Don’t worry, most people have forgotten all about it too! Did you know that 98% of all text messages are read and, although most people don’t like to admit it, 90% of those messages are read within 3 seconds of receiving!

When was the last time your latest blog got those kind of statistics?

Make sure your blog is mobile friendly

Now that I’ve got your attention, the first thing to do is to ensure that your blog is mobile optimized. It seems like a bizarre tip to mention in 2017, but according to a recent survey from BaseKit, 91% of all small businesses do not have a mobile optimised site. Just remember that 100% of your messages are going to be sent to a mobile device!

Once your site is mobile friendly you can start working on your SMS campaign. Ready to go?

Outline your consumer life cycle

First things first, outline your target audience lifecycle.

Segment your audiences so that they receive tailored and personalised messages – nobody likes random spam messages that they’re not interested in.

1. Potential Customers

If somebody has browsed your blog and entered their details into your lead magnet, add them to your hit list. You can send them messages about your latest posts, special offers or an article that you want to particularly push. There’s a reason why they gave you their number, give the people what they want!

2. Existing Customers

Have you got a database of readers that are waiting to go on an event or recently purchased a service / product through your e-shop? This is your chance to up-sell. Get them excited and back on your site! Now that another pay-day has passed they may be interested in that premium product that you’re so eager to sell.

3. Previous Customers

Everyone loves a returning visitor but if they’ve got other things on their minds then they might need a quick tap on the shoulder or a buzz in their pockets.

Planning is key

When you’ve finalised your segments, you can start planning your campaigns.

Don’t worry folks, the beauty of SMS marketing is that it’s not as tedious as email campaigns! It’s all plain text and no designing skills are required. All you need to do is plan your text and pop in a short url link to your blog.

Although there’s a lot of scepticism around short-urls in today’s world; using a long tailed url link tends to fill up half of a mobile screen, which is what triggers the spam radar with most mobile users. Remember to test your SMS campaigns on multiple handheld devices and only send it when you’re completely happy with the presentation.

Sender ID

When creating an SMS campaign it is important to add a sender ID, people like to know quickly where the text came from and make sure that it’s not another spam message from a pestering PPI company. Make sure you set it as either your brand name or a keyword that your audience will associate with you.

Keep it personal

If you’re stuck choosing what text to insert, just think about what you’d like to see from a branded text message. Although you have 160 characters to use, you need to include a call to action, your blog link and be sure to keep upbeat. Oh, and please, please, please double check for spelling errors and typos!

“Even when you are marketing to your entire audience or customer base, you are still simply speaking to a single human at any given time.” – Ann Handley

As you’ll quickly come to realise the majority of your texts will be linking your audience to your latest blog post. Including a special offer within your post and text is a great way of capturing your reader’s attention.

One tip that will immediately boost your open rate is by stating when the offer or link expires. A sense of urgency will always boost engagement, even if it’s a simple bit of text at the end of the message.

Wait for the right moment

As with everything in the marketing world, timing is everything. As you can see in the image below, email opens tend to continue over a period of 24-48 hours before dwindling out. However, SMS campaigns spike within the hour.

If you want to maximise your open rate ensure that you’ve scheduled them to send at the correct time. Chances are, if your recipient is at work, they’re going to read it and then forget about it. You want to target people when they’re most on their mobiles, which tends to be during lunch and late evening.

Take it easy

Don’t be too trigger happy. People have learnt to tolerate email marketing letters on a monthly, weekly and sometimes even daily basis, but customers are not accustomed to receiving multiple text messages.

One quick way to get yourself unsubscribed is to send too many texts, so hold out and wait for a once-in-a-blue-moon kind of deal before creating a blanket campaign. Target your favourite customers through your mobile analytics and you’ll be able to maximise your results without pestering people and tarnishing your brand. As soon as people get annoyed, every time they see one of your posts, they’ll grunt.

If you start using my tips, I’d love to know how they helped you! Let me know your experiences in the comments or on Twitter.

Josh helps manage the Adventure Connections website, who specialise in organising team building events in the UK.

The post How to Use SMS Marketing to Boost Your Blog’s Audience appeared first on ProBlogger.

      

SMS marketing for Bloggers - ProBlogger.com

This guest post is by Josh Sayers of Adventure Connections

Remember SMS? That old-school way of texting people before the dawn of i-message and Whatsapp?

Don’t worry, most people have forgotten all about it too! Did you know that 98% of all text messages are read and, although most people don’t like to admit it, 90% of those messages are read within 3 seconds of receiving!

When was the last time your latest blog got those kind of statistics?

Make sure your blog is mobile friendly

Now that I’ve got your attention, the first thing to do is to ensure that your blog is mobile optimized. It seems like a bizarre tip to mention in 2017, but according to a recent survey from BaseKit, 91% of all small businesses do not have a mobile optimised site. Just remember that 100% of your messages are going to be sent to a mobile device!

Once your site is mobile friendly you can start working on your SMS campaign. Ready to go?

Outline your consumer life cycle

First things first, outline your target audience lifecycle.

Segment your audiences so that they receive tailored and personalised messages – nobody likes random spam messages that they’re not interested in.

1. Potential Customers

If somebody has browsed your blog and entered their details into your lead magnet, add them to your hit list. You can send them messages about your latest posts, special offers or an article that you want to particularly push. There’s a reason why they gave you their number, give the people what they want!

2. Existing Customers

Have you got a database of readers that are waiting to go on an event or recently purchased a service / product through your e-shop? This is your chance to up-sell. Get them excited and back on your site! Now that another pay-day has passed they may be interested in that premium product that you’re so eager to sell.

3. Previous Customers

Everyone loves a returning visitor but if they’ve got other things on their minds then they might need a quick tap on the shoulder or a buzz in their pockets.

Planning is key

When you’ve finalised your segments, you can start planning your campaigns.

Don’t worry folks, the beauty of SMS marketing is that it’s not as tedious as email campaigns! It’s all plain text and no designing skills are required. All you need to do is plan your text and pop in a short url link to your blog.

Although there’s a lot of scepticism around short-urls in today’s world; using a long tailed url link tends to fill up half of a mobile screen, which is what triggers the spam radar with most mobile users. Remember to test your SMS campaigns on multiple handheld devices and only send it when you’re completely happy with the presentation.

Sender ID

When creating an SMS campaign it is important to add a sender ID, people like to know quickly where the text came from and make sure that it’s not another spam message from a pestering PPI company. Make sure you set it as either your brand name or a keyword that your audience will associate with you.

Keep it personal

If you’re stuck choosing what text to insert, just think about what you’d like to see from a branded text message. Although you have 160 characters to use, you need to include a call to action, your blog link and be sure to keep upbeat. Oh, and please, please, please double check for spelling errors and typos!

“Even when you are marketing to your entire audience or customer base, you are still simply speaking to a single human at any given time.” – Ann Handley

As you’ll quickly come to realise the majority of your texts will be linking your audience to your latest blog post. Including a special offer within your post and text is a great way of capturing your reader’s attention.

One tip that will immediately boost your open rate is by stating when the offer or link expires. A sense of urgency will always boost engagement, even if it’s a simple bit of text at the end of the message.

Wait for the right moment

As with everything in the marketing world, timing is everything. As you can see in the image below, email opens tend to continue over a period of 24-48 hours before dwindling out. However, SMS campaigns spike within the hour.

If you want to maximise your open rate ensure that you’ve scheduled them to send at the correct time. Chances are, if your recipient is at work, they’re going to read it and then forget about it. You want to target people when they’re most on their mobiles, which tends to be during lunch and late evening.

Take it easy

Don’t be too trigger happy. People have learnt to tolerate email marketing letters on a monthly, weekly and sometimes even daily basis, but customers are not accustomed to receiving multiple text messages.

One quick way to get yourself unsubscribed is to send too many texts, so hold out and wait for a once-in-a-blue-moon kind of deal before creating a blanket campaign. Target your favourite customers through your mobile analytics and you’ll be able to maximise your results without pestering people and tarnishing your brand. As soon as people get annoyed, every time they see one of your posts, they’ll grunt.

If you start using my tips, I’d love to know how they helped you! Let me know your experiences in the comments or on Twitter.

Josh helps manage the Adventure Connections website, who specialise in organising team building events in the UK.

The post How to Use SMS Marketing to Boost Your Blog’s Audience appeared first on ProBlogger.

      

Web Development Reading List #182: IPFS Wikipedia, New Webpack CLI, And CSS Grid Breakout






 



 


When did you take your last vacation? For many of us, it was probably a long time ago. However, since quite a while, I stumble across more and more stories about companies that take unusual steps vacation-wise. Companies giving their employees a day off each week in summer or going on vacation together as a team building event instead of traveling somewhere just to work.

Web Development Reading List 182

But while there’s a new generation building their dream work environments, a lot of people still suffer from very bad working conditions. They work long hours and are discriminated or harassed by colleagues or their managers. And just this week, I heard that many company owners are desperate because “Generation Y” doesn’t want to work long hours anymore.

The post Web Development Reading List #182: IPFS Wikipedia, New Webpack CLI, And CSS Grid Breakout appeared first on Smashing Magazine.






 



 


When did you take your last vacation? For many of us, it was probably a long time ago. However, since quite a while, I stumble across more and more stories about companies that take unusual steps vacation-wise. Companies giving their employees a day off each week in summer or going on vacation together as a team building event instead of traveling somewhere just to work.

Web Development Reading List 182

But while there’s a new generation building their dream work environments, a lot of people still suffer from very bad working conditions. They work long hours and are discriminated or harassed by colleagues or their managers. And just this week, I heard that many company owners are desperate because “Generation Y” doesn’t want to work long hours anymore.

The post Web Development Reading List #182: IPFS Wikipedia, New Webpack CLI, And CSS Grid Breakout appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

How will Google’s new ‘Ad’ label impact marketers?

Google started testing a new ‘Ad’ label in January this year, and late last week it was confirmed that this will now be rolled out globally.

This white label with green text and a green outline will replace the green label that was launched in June 2016.

The instant reaction to this is that the new labels fit in quite seamlessly with the rest of the paid placement, perhaps creating less of a contrast between them and their organic counterparts.

So why has Google made the change now, what impact will it have have, and will users even notice the change?

The official line on this update is that Google wants to streamline the number of colors on its results pages, particularly on mobile devices. A Google spokesperson revealed:

“After experimenting with a new search ad label with a green outline, we’ve decided to roll it out. The new ad label is more legible and continues to make our results page easier to read for our users with clear indication of our ad labeling.”

Additionally, they claimed that “the color change had no bearing on consumers’ ability to distinguish ads from organic listings on the page.”

So why make the change at all?

First of all, these changes never occur in a vacuum. This is just an indication of a wider trend and should be viewed in the context of the removal of right-hand side ads, expanded text ads, and the consistent drive towards a ‘mobile-first’ approach.

Add in the growth of ad blockers, intensifying competition in the search industry (with both Facebook and Pinterest upping their efforts), and the constant pressure on Google to grow its revenues, and the reasons for moving to a less noticeable ‘Ad’ label become apparent.

We should also beware the source of this information. Google may say it has had no impact in testing, but that seems a convenient line for a company that is close to obsessive in its desire to attract more paid clicks through attention to the minutiae.

Google is famed – sometimes ridiculed – for this constant tinkering, but it does work.

Their highly-publicized ‘50 shades of blue’ experiment was seen by some as a step too far, but Marissa Meyer made sure to state that it drove an extra $200m in ad revenue. Even at a company of Google’s size, those figures talk.

It is also worth remembering where we have come from with these ‘Ad’ labels. People can have short memories – a fact that such frequent adjustments take advantage of – and this latest change makes sense when viewed at a higher level.

Google’s ‘Ad’ labels have gone from garishly overbearing to their latest camouflage iteration in the course of just two years:

The change from yellow to green in mid-2016 was reported to have a positive impact for paid search CTR, and few will doubt that last week’s move was led by exactly the same motive.

But is this just a myopic attempt to gain clicks (and the accompanying revenue) in the short term? Or is there more at play here?

For many in the organic search industry, this will just be another step in the inexorable march towards paid search domination of results pages.

One assumption at the heart of Google’s latest update is that users simply want to get to the result that answers their query, whether a brand has paid for their click or not. Giving more space to paid placements and a never-ending stream of new products to make these ads more attractive undoubtedly gives prominence to sponsored listings.

But, the counter-argument goes, people prefer organic listings. They know an ad when they see it and will go out of their way to avoid it.

Perhaps.

However, one of the reasons this has held sway in the past is that paid search landing pages have at times been of lower quality or of lesser relevance to the query than organic listings. Brands are willing to pay their way to the top, while that right has to be earned in SEO. The quality of the search results in each camp reflected this.

Which brings us to the growing impact of content marketing and user experience signals in SEO. These factors are essential for any successful SEO strategy and they touch all aspects of a brand’s digital footprint – including paid search.

All that effort site owners have put into creating ‘great content’ to improve their SEO rankings plays directly into the hands of AdWords. If Google can convince brands that the best way to get this new content in front of people is to pay for that right, they will do so. The same great content ends up in front of consumers, so everyone wins. Brands still get the traffic (at a higher price), users get the result they want, and Google makes more money.

Someone has to lose, though, and SEO traffic seems most likely to assume this position.

A diminished SEO landscape would be to the detriment of user experience, though, and no monopoly (even one as seemingly immovable as Google) has a divine right to market ownership. Higher CTR for paid listings will have to go hand-in-hand with a better user experience if this pitfall is to be avoided. If the quality of results starts to dip, alternative search engines do exist.

Another argument is that perhaps the role of paid search is starting to change. The AdWords business model is beautifully crafted for a direct response strategy, but it has its limits when it comes to brand marketing. As brand budgets start to move into the digital space, it would make sense to have a less obvious ‘Ad’ label if Google wants to encourage advertisers to spend this budget on AdWords.

As always, there is much room for speculation, even if the central thrust behind this move seems to be an intended increase in paid search revenues.

One thing is for sure, though: we will be keeping a very close eye on CTR for both paid and organic listings over the upcoming days and weeks to see how this plays out.

Google started testing a new ‘Ad’ label in January this year, and late last week it was confirmed that this will now be rolled out globally.

This white label with green text and a green outline will replace the green label that was launched in June 2016.

The instant reaction to this is that the new labels fit in quite seamlessly with the rest of the paid placement, perhaps creating less of a contrast between them and their organic counterparts.

So why has Google made the change now, what impact will it have have, and will users even notice the change?

The official line on this update is that Google wants to streamline the number of colors on its results pages, particularly on mobile devices. A Google spokesperson revealed:

“After experimenting with a new search ad label with a green outline, we’ve decided to roll it out. The new ad label is more legible and continues to make our results page easier to read for our users with clear indication of our ad labeling.”

Additionally, they claimed that “the color change had no bearing on consumers’ ability to distinguish ads from organic listings on the page.”

So why make the change at all?

First of all, these changes never occur in a vacuum. This is just an indication of a wider trend and should be viewed in the context of the removal of right-hand side ads, expanded text ads, and the consistent drive towards a ‘mobile-first’ approach.

Add in the growth of ad blockers, intensifying competition in the search industry (with both Facebook and Pinterest upping their efforts), and the constant pressure on Google to grow its revenues, and the reasons for moving to a less noticeable ‘Ad’ label become apparent.

We should also beware the source of this information. Google may say it has had no impact in testing, but that seems a convenient line for a company that is close to obsessive in its desire to attract more paid clicks through attention to the minutiae.

Google is famed – sometimes ridiculed – for this constant tinkering, but it does work.

Their highly-publicized ‘50 shades of blue’ experiment was seen by some as a step too far, but Marissa Meyer made sure to state that it drove an extra $200m in ad revenue. Even at a company of Google’s size, those figures talk.

It is also worth remembering where we have come from with these ‘Ad’ labels. People can have short memories – a fact that such frequent adjustments take advantage of – and this latest change makes sense when viewed at a higher level.

Google’s ‘Ad’ labels have gone from garishly overbearing to their latest camouflage iteration in the course of just two years:

The change from yellow to green in mid-2016 was reported to have a positive impact for paid search CTR, and few will doubt that last week’s move was led by exactly the same motive.

But is this just a myopic attempt to gain clicks (and the accompanying revenue) in the short term? Or is there more at play here?

For many in the organic search industry, this will just be another step in the inexorable march towards paid search domination of results pages.

One assumption at the heart of Google’s latest update is that users simply want to get to the result that answers their query, whether a brand has paid for their click or not. Giving more space to paid placements and a never-ending stream of new products to make these ads more attractive undoubtedly gives prominence to sponsored listings.

But, the counter-argument goes, people prefer organic listings. They know an ad when they see it and will go out of their way to avoid it.

Perhaps.

However, one of the reasons this has held sway in the past is that paid search landing pages have at times been of lower quality or of lesser relevance to the query than organic listings. Brands are willing to pay their way to the top, while that right has to be earned in SEO. The quality of the search results in each camp reflected this.

Which brings us to the growing impact of content marketing and user experience signals in SEO. These factors are essential for any successful SEO strategy and they touch all aspects of a brand’s digital footprint – including paid search.

All that effort site owners have put into creating ‘great content’ to improve their SEO rankings plays directly into the hands of AdWords. If Google can convince brands that the best way to get this new content in front of people is to pay for that right, they will do so. The same great content ends up in front of consumers, so everyone wins. Brands still get the traffic (at a higher price), users get the result they want, and Google makes more money.

Someone has to lose, though, and SEO traffic seems most likely to assume this position.

A diminished SEO landscape would be to the detriment of user experience, though, and no monopoly (even one as seemingly immovable as Google) has a divine right to market ownership. Higher CTR for paid listings will have to go hand-in-hand with a better user experience if this pitfall is to be avoided. If the quality of results starts to dip, alternative search engines do exist.

Another argument is that perhaps the role of paid search is starting to change. The AdWords business model is beautifully crafted for a direct response strategy, but it has its limits when it comes to brand marketing. As brand budgets start to move into the digital space, it would make sense to have a less obvious ‘Ad’ label if Google wants to encourage advertisers to spend this budget on AdWords.

As always, there is much room for speculation, even if the central thrust behind this move seems to be an intended increase in paid search revenues.

One thing is for sure, though: we will be keeping a very close eye on CTR for both paid and organic listings over the upcoming days and weeks to see how this plays out.